The Attic (a name which commemorates our first physical location) is, first and foremost, a site for the research students of the School of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester: a virtual community which aims to include all students, be they campus-based and full-time, or distance-learning and overseas. But we welcome contributions from students of museum studies - and allied subject areas - from outside the School and from around the world. Here you will find a lot of serious stuff, like exhibition and research seminar reviews, conference alerts and calls for papers, but there's also some 'fluff'; the things that inspire, distract and keep us going. After all, while we may be dead serious academic types, we're human too.

Friday, September 28, 2012

An Intriguing Conference

Call for Papers: Making 1916 - The Material and Visual Culture of the
Easter Rising
Dublin, Ireland April 26-27 2013
Convened by Joanna Brück (University College Dublin) and Lisa Godson
(National College of Art and Design, Dublin)

Please email abstracts of up to 300 words to 1916conference@gmail.com
by December 15 2012.

The Irish Easter Rising of 1916 has long been a focus of historical
research yet its extraordinary material legacy has rarely been
examined. This conference will explore how material and visual
culture were drawn on to construct particular cultural and political
narratives, including changing concepts of nationhood, gender and
religious identity. The role of objects and images in commemorative
practices, the re-imagining of space and creative practices in
relation to the 1916 Rising will also be addressed.

The conference seeks to bring together senior scholars with students,
postdoctoral academics, designers, artists and other researchers. We
welcome researchers drawn from fields including Archaeology,
Anthropology, Geography, Architectural History, History of Design,
Material Culture, Visual Culture, Museum Studies, Art History, History
of Media and Cultural History. We define material and visual culture
and creative practices broadly, encompassing not only artefacts and
spaces related to the ‘event’ and remembrance of the 1916 Easter
Rising, but also attitudes to materiality and visuality.

Some suggested topics:
1916 and television
The Proclamation as artefact
Transubstantiation as a metaphor
Ritual and the Rising
The material culture of militarism
Illustrating 1916
Autograph books
The material/visual culture of internment
Museological practices and 1916
Archiving the Rising
Visual Art and 1916
Uniforming the Volunteers
Commemorative practices
Looting practices and myths at the Rising
Material memories of 1916
Postcards of the Rising
The spaces of reconstruction
Official and unofficial souvenirs
Architecture: destruction and reconstruction
Filmic representations of 1916

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