The Attic (a name which commemorates our first physical location) is, first and foremost, a site for the research students of the School of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester: a virtual community which aims to include all students, be they campus-based and full-time, or distance-learning and overseas. But we welcome contributions from students of museum studies - and allied subject areas - from outside the School and from around the world. Here you will find a lot of serious stuff, like exhibition and research seminar reviews, conference alerts and calls for papers, but there's also some 'fluff'; the things that inspire, distract and keep us going. After all, while we may be dead serious academic types, we're human too.

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Lost Villages

I'm fascinated by the idea of lost places, lost villages - and this has been piqued by finding this post on the Brum Conservation Blog - and then following that this site. Does anyone know of any lost Leicestershire Villages? I'm thinking Museobunny likes this too...

6 comments:

Mike Simpson said...

A quick Google brings up this 2005 BBC gallery of images of Knaptoft.
http://bbc.in/97gmiM

And here's a list of lost Leics villages at Wikipedia: http://bit.ly/bvxA11

Stephanie said...

This is such an interesting subject. Returning briefly to Brum, I noticed there was a lot of coverage on the BBC today about the Birmingham Blitz which was heavily censored, and those areas of the city, some of them hidden and known only to a few, which have served as places of remembrance after the devastation.

Jenny said...

I did not know THAT! Wow, thanks!

Stephanie said...

I had no idea how badly Birmingham suffered-you hear a lot about Coventry, but when thousands of lives were lost in air raids on Brum, the censors referred to it as a 'Midlands town' because they were so worried about morale. A lot of damaged buildings were swept away during the redevelopment of the 1950s and 1960s, but the BBC reporter took viewers down a gated side street which opens out onto a 1940s courtyard which survived the bombing and is now protected. Yesterday marked the 70th anniversary of one of the raids.

Link here:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/birmingham/hi/people_and_places/history/newsid_9198000/9198513.stm

Jenny said...

Wow. Over 2000 killed. I'm ashamed I didn't know.

Jenny said...

And Mike, thanks for the villages - how fascinating. There's a lot in Leicestershire, actually!