The Attic (a name which commemorates our first physical location) is, first and foremost, a site for the research students of the School of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester: a virtual community which aims to include all students, be they campus-based and full-time, or distance-learning and overseas. But we welcome contributions from students of museum studies - and allied subject areas - from outside the School and from around the world. Here you will find a lot of serious stuff, like exhibition and research seminar reviews, conference alerts and calls for papers, but there's also some 'fluff'; the things that inspire, distract and keep us going. After all, while we may be dead serious academic types, we're human too.

Wednesday, January 31, 2007

Conference Alert: The Acquisition and Exhibition of Classical Antiquities

From H-Museum:

The Acquisition and Exhibition of Classical Antiquities: Professional,
Legal, and Ethical

Snite Museum of Art, University of Notre Dame, IN
February 24, 2007

Cultural property and its stewardship has long been a concern of museums,
archaeologists, art historians and nations, but recently the laws, policies,
and consequences of collecting and exhibiting antiquities have also
attracted the broader interest of the media and the public. This has been
the result, in part, of several high profile trials, and various foreign
governments are now demanding the return of specific antiquities to their
countries of origin.

These new circumstances provide the interest and opportunity to open the
question further, to move beyond the rather clear-cut moral response to
looting, and on to the consideration of the more subtle implications of
buying, selling, and exhibiting antiquities. To whom should antiquities
belong? What constitutes legal ownership of antiquities? What laws govern
the importation of antiquities into the US? What circumstances, if any,
demand the return of those antiquities to their nation of origin? Should all
antiquities be returned to their place of origin if they can be properly
cared for and displayed there? Is there a consensus among archaeologists
about these issues? Among museum directors? Do archaeologists and museum
directors share the same opinions?

This symposium will address many sides of the question, including legal and
ethical issues, through presentations by art museum directors,
archaeologists, art historians, and scholars of international law:
http://www.nd.edu/~nanovic/events/antiquities.html.

Sponsored by the Nanovic Institute for European Studies, the Snite Museum,
The Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA), the College of
Arts and Letters, and the Office of Research.

Agenda

Friday, February 23, 2007

7:00 pm Pre-Conference Dinner for speakers, Morris Inn


Saturday, February 24, 2007

Morning Session

9:30-9:35 am Welcome
Jean Ann Linney, Vice President and Associate Provost, University of Notre
Dame

9:35-9:50 am Introduction
Robin F. Rhodes, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Notre
Dame and Director, Greek Architecture Project, Corinth Excavations

9:50-10:00 am Art Museum Director Perspective
James Cuno, President and Eloise W. Martin Director, The Art Institute of
Chicago

10:10-10:15 am Respondent

10:15-10:35 am Archaeologist's Perspective
Malcolm Bell, Professor of Greek Art and Archaeology, University of Virginia
and Director of the University of Virginia Excavations at Morgantina, Sicily

10:35-10:40 am Respondent

10:40-11:00 am Legal Perspective
Patty Girstenblith, Professor of Law, DePaul University

11:00-11:05 am Respondent

11:05-11:15 am Coffee Break

11:15-11:35 am University Museum Director (tba)

11:35-11:40 am Respondent

11:40-12:00 Audience Questions

12:15-1:30 pm Lunch Break


Afternoon Session

Case Studies

1:30-1:50 pm Perspective of the Italian Government
Stefano Vassalo, (Archeologist of the Head Office of the Ministry of
Cultural Heritage and Environment of the city of Palermo)

1:50-1:55 pm Respondent

2:00-2:20 pm International Legal Perspectives
Mary Ellen O'Connell, Robert and Marion Short Chair in Law, University of
Notre Dame

2:25-2:40 Break

2:40-3:00 pm The Corinth Theft
Nancy Bookidis, Co-Director, Corinth Demeter Sanctuary Excavations, American
School of Classical Studies at Athens

3:00-3:05 pm Respondent

3:05-3:25 pm Education of Army Personnel
Brian Rose, James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology, University of
Pennsylvania and President of the Archaeological Institute of America

3:25-3:30 pm Respondent

3:30-4:30 pm Open Discussion chaired by Robin Rhodes

Close of symposium followed by reception at the Snite Museum


Registration Fee
Full registration is $40 and student registration is $20. For Notre Dame
faculty and students, there is no registration fee. All registration fees
include meeting materials, refreshments and reception.

Hotel Accommodations
Rooms are held for the nights of February 23 and 24 at the Morris Inn.
The deadline for all hotel reservations on-line has passed. Requests should
be made directly with the hotel (574-631-2000) and will be honored on a
space available basis at full rate.

Payment Options
Your registration and credit card information will be transmitted through
secure and encrypted channels.
If you would prefer not to use your credit card online, you may pay by check
or separately call or fax your credit card number to the registration
center. To do so, please continue this registration online and select "Fax
Order In" when prompted for payment method. Print the fax form, complete it,
and fax it to the number listed.

Contact:
Eleanor Butterwick
Nanovic Institute
butterwick.2@nd.edu
574-631-3545

or

Robin Rhodes
Snite Museum
rrhodes@nd.edu
574-631-5466

No comments: